Posts Tagged ‘models

16
Sep
14

Still not Perfect

So, I finally got paint on the Mustang. And, immediately found more things that needed filled and sanded….

 

BUT, paint’s been going well, since then. There’s one spot on the passenger side front fender that’s going to need another shot of the base color, because the masking tape pulled off some small flecks. That’s been the only real problem, so far. As I’m painting the car up like a WWII fighter plane, it’s got six colors going on it, not counting painted on trim, like the reflectors. Base coat is aluminum, the nose is guard’s red, the hood is olive drab (as will be the planned tonneau cover over where the back seat used to be) white and black invasion stripes are going on the front fenders as a nod to the fender stripes that some classic muscle and sports cars sport, and the back of the car will be yellow. All but the yellow are Model Master acrylic paints. The yellow will be Vellejo Model Color. It’s possible I may lose my mind, and paint the back end in a red and white checkered pattern instead, but I’m pretty sure it’ll be yellow. I don’t even want to think about masking a checker pattern. The angle of the separation between the base color and the yellow will be determined by the side pieces on the new rear spoiler. I’ve got the three piece spoiler off a Roush version of this same car, that will be going on this one.

 

mustang1_2 mustang1_3 mustang1_4

 

The body isn’t currently attached to the chassis, and the grill and headlights are just sitting in place. Everything but the OD green will be gloss clear coated. Honestly, I’m still not sure why the red has that semigloss look to it. I think the paint might have been too thick. (I airbrush) I think you can just make out where I did some polishing on the hood. Incidentally, Maas metal polish, used sparingly, works great on Model Master paint. I also know from past experience that it will attack Future floor polish, which is a popular choice for gloss coat among many modellers. Consider yourself warned. The aluminum paint, on the other hand, went down with a nice satiny sheen.

 

The side picture shows the contour lines that were giving me grief. See that crease that curves back from above the door handle? It was not cast into the body. I formed the edge with a thin strip of styrene plastic, then filled in around it with Fixit Sculpt, and blended it into the rest of the body. It was actually the straight line underneath it that caused the most trouble. The one on the passenger side is fine. I don’t get it. Those SVT wheels and tires are from GreenLight. They took very little work to fit the Maisto wheel bushings. The original wheels and tires were slightly over-sized. They filled the wheel wells nicely, but I’ve lowered this car at both ends. Besides, they also represented the stock Mustang wheels. These are a nicer looking design. I’m modding the other wheels into generic retro style five stars for a ’72 Trans Am. Still debating painting some olive drab on these GreenLight wheels.

 

The rally lights in the grill have been replaced with wire mesh intakes. I’ve got some mocked up tubing ends to put behind them, to look like functional cold air intakes. Got the wire mesh from a cheap tea ball I picked up at wal-mart. I’ve got some larger mesh, for another project, from a strainer also gotten on the cheap from wal-mart. The mesh flattens out easily, and holds whatever shape I put it in.

05
Sep
14

Perfect is the Enemy

“Perfect is the enemy of good” so the saying goes. I find that in my case, perfect is the enemy of getting things finished. I’m modifying one of those cheap die cast cars from Sam’s Club, (I understand Costco sells them, too.) into a street fighter type custom. Not that I’ve seen too many convertible street fighters, but I’ve seen guys mod station wagons into competitive race cars, so, why not. The body work on this car mostly involves new rocker panels and lower rear trim. The rockers are long finished, I haven’t started on the rear trim, yet. It’s an overly complicated shape to meet the body, so I’m still thinking it through and weighing my options. I’m also smoothing out the surround around the lower intake area on the front, and adding some curved accent lines on the body that the real car has and the model, for some reason, doesn’t. This is where my problem lies.

 

The body work on the sides is mostly finished. There’s another accent line below where the work was that’s gotten a bit messed up on one side. It was a soft detail to begin with, and I had to blend right down to it. I’ve gotten it to the point of “good enough.” No, the real fun is the front. Nice big flat surfaces. Simple, right? This work involved filing down a lip, then filling a large groove to extend the front bumper down. The filling was done with Ave’s Fixit Sculpt, but I didn’t get things quite as flat as I’d wanted. Primer made the imperfections visible, and I smoothed them out with Tamiya white putty and a sanding stick. Another coat of primer showed that it still wasn’t quite smooth. I really want to get this car finished, so I can move on to another one that I’m more interested in working on, but is going to need a lot more work.

 

I had it pretty close, so I said “Screw it, it’s good enough!”

 

That was three putty and sanding sessions ago….

mustang1_1

 

The bright white you’re seeing there is the Tamiya putty, the red is the factory paint. I mostly left the paint intact, just sanded it. It let me bring back a lot of the edges that were lost to either thick paint, or weird things die cast metal does when it cools after casting. I thought it might make good primer too, but I think my primer might actually be sticking better to the metal. Didn’t expect that out of acrylic model paint. If you look close, you can see some off white in there, too. That’s the Fixit Sculpt, where I’ve sanded through the primer. It’s getting painted, as it is.

 

No really. I mean it, this time.

 

If you’re wondering why I’m dedicating so much effort on such a cheap model, when there’s much nicer die cast cars out there? I’d rather screw up a twenty dollar car, than a hundred and twenty dollar car.

04
Mar
14

Trolled

One corner of my small N scale model train layout is taken up by the Greytech Heavy Industries building. This is just a foot deep shelf layout, so it’s far from the entire complex modeled. It has recently come to my attention that the building, as modeled, is incapable of receiving one type of freight it’s supposed to handle. Specifically, steel coil cars. Many of the company’s products are made from heavy metal sheet, so there needs to be a way of unloading them. This requires a gantry crane. The steel coils can be unloaded by forklifts, but a crane is still needed to handle the covers on them.

 

This picture was taken some years back, the last time I was working on the trains.

hobb_creek1_big

 

That loading dock is fine, for box cars and flat cars. The track extended a little past it, and the plan was to put in some scale hoses for unloading air pressure operated covered hoppers commonly used for plastic pellets. It’s a technology company, they’re going to use a lot of plastic. Even if there was a place to put a gantry, there’s no place to move the coil car’s cover. SO…. I had hoped to take that two-story section on the far part of the building (what I consider the “old section”) and just move the wall forward. The side wall is still there, I could just cut a hole in, and build a door frame.

 

The corner wasn’t together too good, and I destroyed it trying to pull it apart. And, it’s just not long enough to house an entire train car. So, not only do I need to build an entire new building section, I have to cut out part of that warehouse/loading wing. Sometimes I feel like I’m being trolled by the modelling gods….

 

hobb_creek9_big

The Stay Puft Marshmallow Man has failed. The troll has risen.

 

 

That’s the current state of the GTHI building. I don’t have anything on hand to build the new section. What I do have is a program called “Model Builder.” (original, right?) It uses photo sourced textures to make paper models. It designed specifically, for model railroad scenery. Until now, I’ve only ever used it to make background flats for action figure diorama sets. The new section will only need two walls, and I’ll probably make the roof out of foam core. Eventually, it would be nice to replace the thing with something made from styrene, it should be fine, for now. I’ve never seen small-scale paper model buildings first hand, so maybe it’ll be good enough to be permanent. I’m also hoping to make a shallow flat to represent another part of the building, behind the four-story section. I mostly want to do that to push the four-story part out a little, mostly to improve the look of where the new unloading section will meet it. I should probably just replace the whole thing. That part is a twenty+ year old model, and its finish isn’t up to my current standards. For now, I’m hoping to eventually rehab it. I’m not too worried about the various bits not matching, since I’ve always envisioned the place as being a slightly erratic collection old brick buildings and annexes that have sort of grown together.

 

The place is probably so convoluted inside, David Bowie’s using it to raise a goblin army.

 

That building in the foreground of that second pictures is the unloading shed of a steel fabricator. They receive steel plate and structural shapes to build bridge and building components. Currently calling it Strogg Steel, after the cyborg antagonists from the Quake 2 and Quake 4 video games.

02
Mar
14

Tree

I’ve been messing with model trains again, lately. Finally got the damn things running smooth. That’s taking a disturbing amount of maintenance.

Anyway, the scenery is far from finished, and I want to finally start building the “tree tunnel” that I’ve always planned to mask where the trains enter and exit one end of the layout. In the past, I’ve made my trees from clump foliage on Woodland Scenics armatures. Still using the WS trees (I’ve got them, why not?) but decided to try a different product. I stretched some MRC cluster foliage over one of the WS tree armatures…. and didn’t like it. The dark green color I have seems awfully vivid on its own, and there’s a lot visible “hairs” among the foam in the stuff. I do, however, like all the negative space it creates, it has a similar “seeing through the leaves” effect as looking through a real tree. I tried sprinkling some ground foam over it, but I don’t really have that’s a similar shade. Most of what I have is lighter colored and far more drab. There is one thing I have on hand that’s a similar color; Woodland Scenics fine leaf foliage. It has a similar see through effect, and a lot of fine branches throughout. So, I tried gluing that over the stretched out fiber cluster.

tree1

I have to upgrade the rest of the trees on the layout, now….

Yeah, I’m really happy with the effect. The only problem is I don’t want all the trees to be the exact same shade, so I’ll have to get some more fine leaf foliage, in a different shade. I was already planning to order a couple of things from Fifer Hobby Supplies, so that goes on the list.

15
Dec
13

More Tales From the Garage

garage2

I’ve been slowly modifying that die-cast Mustang. It’s a cheap one, from Sam’s Club. Given the price a lot of die-cast cars go for, I’d be hesitant to cut into one. These go for so little, it’s pretty much game on. Most of the changes to this one will be relatively minor, with a super charger and air ducting  under the hood being the most drastic changes.

It’ll be getting new low mounted rally lights pulled from a 1/24 scale model to replace the ones in the grill that I’m turning into air intakes. New rocker panels are halfway finished, and I’ll be making a matching piece to replace the ugly black trim part that wraps around the bottom back of the car. The model is missing an accent line that should start on the doors and extend back in an arch to the quarter panels. I’ll be making the hard line from that out of styrene sheet, and feathering it into the bodywork with sanding and Fixit Sculpt. The final paint job will be two-tone red, with a thin gold stripe between. New wheels are planned, and I’ve already replaced the plastic steering column with a new one made of brass. It’s taken most of the slop out of the steering, and the wheels hold their positions better.

Yes, I am probably the only person in the world that cares about slop in the steering of a toy car.

I’ve slightly lowered the front ride height. The rear ride height was a little too low, from the factory. Together, it makes it look like an evenly lowered car. I’m not much into the whole “stancing” thing, but I’m seeing this as a “street fighter” type car, modified for better handling.  A diffuser on the front, and  tonneau cover where the rear seat used to be, along with a roll bar will round out the look. I’m also hoping to replace the seats with better sized and shaped ones. The current ones are too small. Current plan is to scratch build one and cast it.

This car something of a practice piece. I’ll be working on a similar one from the same manufacturer to make a very different looking car. That one will be turned into a fast back styled hard top, and made to look like a 2013/2014 car, instead of the 2010+ style it comes modeled after. That one will get a similar lowering in the front, but have the rear end raised. I figure that will help give it a completely different attitude from the convertible. More of a brawler, to the this car’s dancer.

I just hope my reach doesn’t exceed my grasp….

15
Sep
13

The Intervention

Don’t you hate it when you’re working on something, minding your own business, and someone has to come along and disturb you. “You haven’t eaten in five days. Step away from the dozens of unfinished projects, and eat a sammich.” It’s always something….

 

intervention1

19
Jul
13

Works in Progress

wips1

I have this bad habit of starting one project, before I finish the previous one. It doesn’t help that I often work at a rate that can almost be described in geological terms. This leaves me with a lot of things sitting around in an unfinished state, sometimes for years. The two figures in the back are victims of that. The painted figure is only recently finished. It’s the human form of my werewolf “Greyryder” character. He’s supposed to look like me, but all my attempts to cut scale glasses out of clear plastic failed, and I hate sculpted on glasses. They never look right. I tend to go with the smallest frames I can find, so trying to make something roughly twice the size of  those little reading glasses they sell in stores in 1/18 scale is a challenge. Keep in mind, I’ll need multiples. There’s an unjacketed version not in the picture that I’m still working on, and in fact started before the one in the picture. I’m also working on a swappable head with a baseball cap sculpted on.

Now, a lot of the ships in this picture are “casual” builds. Most of them will just get cleaned up, built mostly out of the box, painted, and decalled. There’s a second one of the TOS Enterprises that will be getting modified, molds made, and parts cast so I can build a better Enterprise, and other ships from that era. I’m also planning an improved movie style Enterprise, and I’ve nearly finished the nacelles. The Enterprise B in the back will be getting some minor improvements, before I’m ready to paint it. Like my Hobb Creek, it’ll have its Aztec patterns painted in clear coat, rather than the screen accurate ILM mottle.

The heads near the front are modified castings. Optimus is cast from a Reveal the Shield G2 style Optimus Prime, and is being modified to be based (if a bit loosely) on the Alternators Prime head. It’ll be an alternate head for the “Joeformer” Prime I made a while back. The head next to it is spliced together from two different Snake Eyes heads. Actually, one was a Snake Eyes disquise Zartan head. I’ll be sculpting over it to make a head based on some concept images I’ve seen from G.I. Joe: Retalliation. Next to them is a narrow pack for a G.I. Joe Duke I’m working on. I started out trying to imitate the one that comes with the Sideshow made Duke, the more I looked at it, the less sense its construction made to me. One of the problems of only have internet sourced reference pictures, I guess. I wound up just making my own design.

The two unfinished figures are spiced together from various source figures, ground down with a moto-tool, and sculpted over. The one on the Left side of the picture is Hellchick V2, an unproduced player model for Quake 4, and very different from the Hellchick model released for Quake 3. Her design comes from Autodestruct.com. (NSFW warning, there’s some gory creatures and topless women among the artwork.) I haven’t decided if I’m going to keep her topless, like the source art shows her. Maybe I’m just a prude, but I’m not sure I’m ready to have an anatomically correct figure in my collection. I started making her mostly as an excercise in detail sculpting. She’s got a lot of straps buckles and hardware on her, that I wanted to try my hand at sculpting, without making them too thick or course. It’s actually her gauntlet and the broken off horns on the right side of her head. The horns I’m just having trouble keeping the shape of what’s still there to match the whole horns on the other side of her head. The two headed thing on the other side is an original design. It’s supposed to be Gigeresque, but I’ve never been good at surface detail in any of my art. That’s been a big stumbling block, for me.

Other things that aren’t in this picture are a “Joeformer” Wheeljack, that was started well before Optimus was. There’s also two figures that are meant to be the siblings of the first G.I. Joe figure I customized, A version of the catgirl from my webcomic. They’re mostly waiting on accessories. There’s the Atomic Robo figure I haven’t even started sculpting on, yet. As far as heavily sculpted figures go, I’ve also got my “Demon King” character, who’s supposed to be sort of an armored mutant cyborg werejackal sort of thing. His base frame has been mostly assembled, I just have to design some armor for him, so I can get started sculpting him. I just want something more detailed/ornate than I usually come up with. Got a lot of ideas in my head for figures I’d like to make, but haven’t started on; two different werewolves, a 1/18 less stylized Xevoz Moon Stalker, a satyr girl, and the woman who rejected the Demon King. Probably some others, that have slipped my mind, too.

And then, there’s the diorama stuff I want to build….

24
Jun
13

U.S.S. Hobb Creek pt. 4

uss_hobbcreek15

 

 

Gonna call her done, for now. Decals are on, a layer of flat clear has been applied, and the last few details have been painted on. All the windows have been hand painted in either flat white, or gloss black, depending on whether they lit, or not. Aztec panels were painted on in gloss, to provide an effect like the refit Enterprise filming model had, instead of the mottled diseased look that most newer Trek ships have. The decals have been done to reflect late 24th century practices, so the side markings are similar to Voyager’s with the larger lettering and registry instead of the sip’s name. I also left the red outline off the ship’s name on the saucer, for the same reason. The escape pods are similar to what’s on the Nova class, just because I like their look. The decals were made at 1200DPI, which nearly choked Paint Shop Pro 9. It doesn’t like doing vectors that large, and all the text was done as vectors. Other graphics were scraped from various corners of the web, and modified as needed.

 

uss_hobbcreek12

 

uss_hobbcreek13

 

uss_hobbcreek14

 

The aztecing, being done in clear, is subtle enough that it doesn’t show up well in pictures.  That last picture was taken specifically to show it off. It’s most visible on the saucer, but it is everywhere on the ship. The only parts of the hull I didn’t paint it on, are the colored sections on the engineering hull. Those are decals made from graphics I found a while back on the Starship Modeller website. I gray scaled them, so that my base colors would show through. The patterns are surprisingly crisp, but subtle, and hard to capture on camera. Or, I’m just horrible at taking pictures. I suspect it’s that last one.

 

The background image in the picture at the top of this entry is from http://hameed.deviantart.com/art/Deep-Space-Nebula-152575344

13
Jun
13

USS Hobb Creek pt. 3

Guess who’s back, back again…. Sorry. I’ll stop, now.

 

Anyway. Seems I neglected to post the last few things I got finished on the Hobb Creek model. I cut some .010″ thick styrene sheet to make phaser strips. There’s two on top of the saucer, two more on the bottom, one on the bottom of the secondary hull, and one on each side of the shuttle bay area. The styrene was cut into straight strips, and worked into curves into it before being glued down.

uss_hobbcreek6 uss_hobbcreek7

 

Since I’m doing this as a 24th century ship, I went with a darker base color than the refit Enterprise had. It’s also a nice call back to the original series ship. I went with Model Master Jet Exhaust for the phaser strips, since it looks closest to the strips on the filming models, of anything I have. I suppose black or Tamiya Gunmetal would have worked too, given how they always looked on screen.

 

The warp grills, deflector crystal, and main deflector were painted white, and thinned down light blue paint was used to create a glow effect. The main deflector recieved some extra attention with a darker shade of blue around the outer edge. The Bussard collectors were painted with Model master Italian Red, which, as red paint goes, is pretty orange. If I was building a General Lee model, this would be my first choice. (unless I was doing the movie version) Unfortunately, I bought this paint for a Ferrari model….  On top of the Italian red, I painted yellow “Kirby dots” to try to create the impression of a chaotic looking energy field inside. There’s no real cannon example of this, unless you count the random blinking lights in the filming model from TOS, which has since been retconned into kind of spinamajig. I just think it would look neat, on screen. Over the red orange and yellow, I painted transparent red.

 

The other details were painted, mostly by going off photos of the refit Enterprise filming model.

uss_hobbcreek8 uss_hobbcreek9

And, I just realized I never took any pictures of it, with the glowy bits painted…. Brilliant.

 

Moving right along…. I’ve gotten started on making the image file to print the decals from. I’m still in the phase of making sure things are sized and shaped right. I’ll get the red outlines on the saucer name and registry decals once I’m finished with the test fitting. Since I’m still in the test fitting stage, I’m printing things out on regular printer paper. Final decals will will be printed on clear paper. Once the decals are down, and sealed unter a layer of flat clear coat, I plan on painting the Aztec paneling on with gloss clear. I have never liked the ILM style of Aztecing, that they started with the Reliant. It makes no sense why every panel on the ship would be painted a slightly different shade than every surrounding panel. The refit Enterprise model had it right, giving the impression of light reflecting differently off the panels, as they wrapped around all the ship’s compound curves.

uss_hobbcreek10

 

Yes, the registry is ridiculously improbable. Obviously, I don’t subscribe to the notion that only Enterprise keeps the same registry, with each succeeding ship. The NX is only because she’s a technology tester. I actually prefer a proper NCC registry, but it just doesn’t work with this ship’s back story of being a test bed for bleeding edge, experimental technology.

05
May
13

USS Hobb Creek pt2

After one failed attempt, I successfully modified a saucer, with a new Exeter style superstructure. The first attempt failed, because I made it way too big. Most of the ship’s parts are in place now, but the saucer is currently on only by a friction fit. Took this picture on the Infinitely Variable Diorama, so it’s much clearer than the previous pictures are.

uss_hobbcreek5

This time, I made the superstructure only slightly wider than the existing B deck blister. I made it by cutting off the bridge, and grinding down the top of the B deck. I cut the top of the new superstructure out of thin sheet styrene. (.o20″ inch thick, I believe) A small piece of thicker styrene was glued in to hold the back of the superstructure roof in place. Before the setting the new “B deck roof” in place, I cut a hole in it for the bridge module. The bridge was from another saucer casting. Part of the B deck from the donor saucer was left on the bottom of the bridge, the same thickness as the sheet styrene. I originally tried cutting this extra material off, so I could glue the bridge directly to the styrene. I ruined that first bridge in the attempt. The bridge was glued to the filed down B deck with Goop (can’t seem to fin Shoe Goo locally) so that I could move it around a little, and make sure it was properly centered on the saucer. Doing it that way also made it easier to get the top of the superstructure lined up properly. Any gaps around the bridge were filled in with Fixit Sculpt, at the same time I filled in the sides of the superstructure with the same. A cut down deflector crystal, taken from the donor saucer, was glued in place on the back of the new superstructure. Since I wanted it to sit level on an angled surface, it was easier to just file it down thin enough to sit on top of the the new superstructure. I drilled a small divot where it would go, to give the Goop some place to go. Once the deflector crystal was where I wanted it, and the Goop had cured, I put a little superglue around the base of it to hold it in place. A little bit of Fixit sculpt was worked in around it, as well, to fill in any remaining gaps. I scribed a few lines into the top of the new superstructure, to break up the other wise featureless surface. After that, the modified saucer was placed into the lower half of the mold I’d made, and a new upper half was made.

At this point, the nacelle struts have been reinforced with piano wire, and the wire has been sculpted over with Fixit Sculpt. The struts and nacelles have been glued in place, and the seams have been filled with more Fixit Sculpt. I’ve added the angled side fins to the nacelles. There’s a little bit of cleaning up I still need to do around the joints where the struts hit the hull and nacelles, and the saucer has a couple of minor blemishes to fix. Then, I’ll glue the saucer permanently in place, and clean up that juncture. After that, it’s paint and decals. I’ve already tracked down the fonts I need to make markings appropriate for a ship in service in the late 24th century. I’m not thrilled with the way the font handles the outlines around the letters, but it’s not difficult to work around.

I can’t seem to resist creating back stories around the things I create.  The ship itself doesn’t have much of a story, other than having previously been the U.S.S. Whitfield, before being retired and then relegated to the bone yard. The crew however, is where the real story lies. It involves a spacial anomaly, time dilation, and a 23rd century ship finding itself in the 24th century mirror universe. I hope to eventually build the original Hobb Creek. That one is a design entirely my own, but using TOS Constitution parts. I’ll probably have to scratch build that one’s engineering hull, since it’s a four nacelle design. I mention this, because with the mirror universe involved, there is another Hobb Creek.

iss_hobbcreek1

This one will have a few spotting differences from its Federation counterpart. Current plan is for completely different nacelles. The impulse engines will be closer in design to the Exeter class from Star Trek Online, as well.




Archive

Calender

August 2020
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31